Yearly Archives: 2014


Attack of the Poodle

A new security attack (dubbed the POODLE attack) makes continued use of SSLv3 dangerous. So effective immediately, we are dropping support for SSLv3. Browser users will likely see minimal-to-no impact. If you are having an issue please try a newer version of your browser.

Extremely old browsers (specifically IE 6 users on Windows XP) will no longer be able to connect to devZing pages. We performed a traffic analysis that shows this would have affected no customers in the last 90 days.


Github Integration

This integration will allow you to use GetHub commit comments to update bugs

This will cause any commit comments to be added to bugs references by the comment. E.g. the commit comment “This fixes bug 123” will cause “This fixes bug 123” to be added as a comment to bug 123.

You must configure both Github and devZing to make this work.

Github configuration

To configure GitHub click Settings when viewing your repository

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Click Webhooks & Services

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Click Add Webhook

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Fill in the Payload URL:

  • If using the US datacenter use https://app.devzing.com/<account>/bugzilla/extensions/GithubWebhook/
  • If using the UK datacenter https://uk-bz1.devzing.com/<account>/extensions/GithubWebhook/

Content type can be either application/json or application/x-www-form-urlencoded

Feel free to add a secret as we will be supporting this soon.

Make sure you have selected “Just the push event” as other event types will be ignored.

Then click Add Webhook to save your webhook.

devZing configuration

Next log into your devZing account and click “Manage Global Settings”

In the “Github Integration” section select a Bugzilla user that will be used for the integration.

Click Save.

Using

In daily use just include the keyword “bug” next to the Bugzilla defect ID you want to update in the commit message. Remember that the Github webhooks aren’t executed until you push your changes and that there can be several commits in a single push. Every commit message in a push will be evaluated so you can update 1 or 100 bugs in a single push.


September Downtime Complete

It took a few hours longer than planned due to the SAN reporting some issues after restarting, but we are back up and running.


XML-RPC Client

From time to time we’ve had people wonder if the XML-RPC API is turned on for their Bugzilla installation. The answer is yes in all cases. Nevertheless it is difficult to verify as Bugzilla will not give you a meaningful response if you go to https://<mybugzilla>/xmlrpc.cgi in your browser.

Other clients want to verify some off error message they are getting from a tool that integrates with Bugzilla through the XML-RPC API.

To solve these questions we have deployed our online XML-RPC client.

xml-rpc client

By default it has the URL and credentials for our Bugzilla demo, but you can point it to any Bugzilla with XML-RPC enabled (even https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/).

The tricky bit is the parameter XML.

Bugzilla XML-RPC expects a single <struct> element. The names of the parameters listed in the API docs for each function are the <name> element for the struct <member>s. See Bugzilla::WebService::Server::XMLRPC and Bugzilla::WebService for more information.

For example

<param>
 <struct>
 <member>
 <name>Bugzilla_login</name>
 <value>demo@devzing.com</value>
 </member>
 <member>
 <name>Bugzilla_password</name>
 <value>password</value>
 </member> 
 </struct>
</param>

This is the minimum set of parameters for Bugzilla 4.4.x as almost all methods require authentication.

To retrieve a bug you need to set the method to Bug.get and parameter XML to something like the following:

<param>
 <struct>
 <member>
 <name>Bugzilla_login</name>
 <value>demo@devzing.com</value>
 </member>
 <member>
 <name>Bugzilla_password</name>
 <value>password</value>
 </member>
 <member>
 <name>ids</name>
 <value>
   <array>
     <data>
       <value><i4>12</i4></value>
     </data>
   </array>
</value>
 </member>
</struct> 
</param>

For more information on how to represent various data types see the XML-RPC specification.


September Downtime Notice

We have scheduled a 6 hour downtime window on Sunday Sept 28 starting at 02:00 GMT.

During this downtime we will be performing some major infrastructure upgrades including:

  • New redundant routers, switches and firewalls.
  • 10Gbps Internet connectivity to multiple carriers.
  • New redundant 8Gbps fiber channel switching fabrics (A and B side fabrics) for storage.
  • 5 new SANs (Storage frames).
  • Upgraded power.

The bulk of this new equipment is already installed and tested. During the downtime we will be physically moving the servers to the new cabinets and verifying the final configuration. We are doing everything possible ahead of time to ensure a smooth and trouble free upgrade.


All Bugzilla Accounts Upgraded to 4.4.5

Bugzilla 4.4.5 is a security release which addresses the following issue:

Adobe does not properly restrict the SWF file format, which allows remote attackers to conduct cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attacks against Bugzilla’s JSONP endpoint, possibly obtaining sensitive bug information, via a crafted OBJECT element with SWF content satisfying the character-set requirements of a callback API.

For more details see: https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1036213

Interestingly this bug only seems to affect Firefox users.


Bugzilla 4.4 Released

Welcome to Bugzilla 4.4! This new major release comes with several new features and improvements. This release contains major improvements to WebServices, which was the main target in this release, a rewritten tagging system, a real MIME type auto-detection for attachments, performance improvements and lots of other enhancements.